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Cyber-attacks are the fastest growing crimes throughout Australia and across the world. And with the majority of businesses not insured against cyber-attacks, the effect can be crippling. Take a look at our infographic to learn more and see if you are covered against cybercrime.

Cyber Infographic

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Guild Insurance

Professional Indemnity Insurance

Latest Articles

  • Guild's guide to a risk free holiday season

    risks

    With the holiday season approaching, it’s time to remind ourselves of the possible threats to our homes and cars during this time. In the lead up to what should be a fun and festive time with loved ones, it’s important to think about what you can do to protect your valuable assets during this period.

    Thefts and burglaries increase at this time as a lot of crime is opportunistic; thieves know that houses and cars might be full of newly purchased gifts. Thieves also know that with people away on holidays, there is an increased opportunity to break into cars and homes.

    However, holiday dangers aren’t just about thefts and burglaries. People also need to think about what they can do to protect their homes and cars from damage or unnecessary costs while on holidays, as well as keeping themselves safe.

    Protecting your home
    Before heading off on holidays:

    • Be mindful of how you dispose of packaging of gifts or newly purchased items. A bin full of boxes for items such as televisions, game consoles or tablets lets people know what valuable items are in the home.

    • Ask a friend or neighbour to collect your mail. A build-up of mail is a sure sign someone isn’t home.

    • Use a timer to have your house lights turn on and off at certain periods of the day, creating a look of someone being in.

    • Consider what appliances can be turned off within your home. While usage is low, many appliances continue to use power even when they aren’t being used. Items to consider turning off include hot water tanks, televisions, microwaves and computers. However, be sure to think about what you’re turning off before you quickly switch off all power; for example, fridges and freezers, unless empty, should be kept on.

    • Clear out your gutters. A build-up of leaves and other debris creates a fire hazard as well as a risk of an overflow of water entering the roof space during a storm.

    Protecting your car

    • If leaving your car at home while on holidays, where possible leave it locked securely in a garage or somewhere else out of sight. Thieves will notice a car sitting in the sam spot every day which hasn’t moved.

    • Don’t keep valuables in sight that could entice those opportunistic
    thieves. This applies to items used all year, such as mobile phones. However, over the holiday season it also applies to shopping bags which are clearly full of new items.

    • When taking your car on holidays, be sure you have some sort of roadside assistance or breakdown coverage to protect you during those
    unexpected moments.

    • If sharing driving duties during a road trip, be sure the insurance policy for the car covers all drivers.

    • Take regular breaks on long drives by either swapping drivers or taking rest breaks. Also, when on long drives, plan your stops to allow for petrol fill ups and food and drink stops.

    • Be particularly careful when driving at dawn and dusk as visibility generally isn’t as clear as during the day.


    Download the printable version

    riskhq-download-button

  • Five tips to avoid a devastating fire

    accidents

    Even the smallest fire could wipe out your business. Here’s five tips to avoid a devastating fire all year round:

    1. Clear space is a must
    To help prevent overheating, ensure there’s enough clear space around all electrical equipment.

    2. Avoid using temporary options
    Extension cords and power boards were designed to be temporary options. Where possible, have additional power points installed.

    3. Maintain your workspace
    Keep dust, moisture and clutter to a minimum. Avoid having food, drinks and flammable items near electrical equipment.

    4. Implement safety measures
    Maintain your property and ensure your fire safety services are always up to date.

    5. Those who fail to plan, plan to fail
    In the unfortunate event of a fire, a simple action plan can minimise the risk of harm to people and property.

    For more information call 1800 810 213 or visit your local Fire Service website.

Most Viewed

  • Guild's guide to a risk free holiday season

    risks

    With the holiday season approaching, it’s time to remind ourselves of the possible threats to our homes and cars during this time. In the lead up to what should be a fun and festive time with loved ones, it’s important to think about what you can do to protect your valuable assets during this period.

    Thefts and burglaries increase at this time as a lot of crime is opportunistic; thieves know that houses and cars might be full of newly purchased gifts. Thieves also know that with people away on holidays, there is an increased opportunity to break into cars and homes.

    However, holiday dangers aren’t just about thefts and burglaries. People also need to think about what they can do to protect their homes and cars from damage or unnecessary costs while on holidays, as well as keeping themselves safe.

    Protecting your home
    Before heading off on holidays:

    • Be mindful of how you dispose of packaging of gifts or newly purchased items. A bin full of boxes for items such as televisions, game consoles or tablets lets people know what valuable items are in the home.

    • Ask a friend or neighbour to collect your mail. A build-up of mail is a sure sign someone isn’t home.

    • Use a timer to have your house lights turn on and off at certain periods of the day, creating a look of someone being in.

    • Consider what appliances can be turned off within your home. While usage is low, many appliances continue to use power even when they aren’t being used. Items to consider turning off include hot water tanks, televisions, microwaves and computers. However, be sure to think about what you’re turning off before you quickly switch off all power; for example, fridges and freezers, unless empty, should be kept on.

    • Clear out your gutters. A build-up of leaves and other debris creates a fire hazard as well as a risk of an overflow of water entering the roof space during a storm.

    Protecting your car

    • If leaving your car at home while on holidays, where possible leave it locked securely in a garage or somewhere else out of sight. Thieves will notice a car sitting in the sam spot every day which hasn’t moved.

    • Don’t keep valuables in sight that could entice those opportunistic
    thieves. This applies to items used all year, such as mobile phones. However, over the holiday season it also applies to shopping bags which are clearly full of new items.

    • When taking your car on holidays, be sure you have some sort of roadside assistance or breakdown coverage to protect you during those
    unexpected moments.

    • If sharing driving duties during a road trip, be sure the insurance policy for the car covers all drivers.

    • Take regular breaks on long drives by either swapping drivers or taking rest breaks. Also, when on long drives, plan your stops to allow for petrol fill ups and food and drink stops.

    • Be particularly careful when driving at dawn and dusk as visibility generally isn’t as clear as during the day.


    Download the printable version

    riskhq-download-button

  • Advertising: A timely reminder

    advertising

    Reading relevant articles can count towards your required continuing professional development hours.  Therefore, reading the article below may assist you to achieve these required hours. (see more below)

    Advertising compliance has been on the Australian Health Practitioner Regulation Agency’s radar recently, with Meridian Lawyers assisting a number of health practitioners, including dental practitioners, in relation to notices of concern.

    Advertising restrictions – the legislation

    Section 133 of the Health Practitioner Regulation National Law, as in force in each state and territory (the National Law), prohibits advertising that (in connection with a regulated health service):

    1. is false, misleading or deceptive or is likely to be so
    2. offers a gift, discount or other inducement to attract a user of the health service without stating the terms and conditions of the offer
    3. uses testimonials or purported testimonials
    4. creates an unreasonable expectation of beneficial treatment, and/or
    5. encourages the indiscriminate or unnecessary use of health services (see Dental Board Guidelines).

    Examples of compliance issues

    Some of the recently identified issues relate to:

    • interactions with patients on social media, including reviews left by patients on a dental practice’s Facebook page where the content of the review may qualify as a testimonial
    • a practitioner who offered a free home whitening kit when the patient underwent a particular course of treatment
    • ‘two for the price of one’ offers for dental services such as implants or crowns, particularly where the patient seeing the advertising has not yet been examined or treatment planned, and where the full terms and conditions of the offer are not fully and not prominently displayed with the offer
    • the use of words, terms, or titles, which may indicate or which may be seen to indicate to the public, that a practitioner is a specialist practitioner in circumstances where the practitioner is not so qualified and/or endorsed.The advertising rules (and penalties) apply to anyone and any entity that advertises a regulated health service – whether that person or entity is a registered health practitioner or not.

    The following AHPRA/Dental Board publications are relevant:

    AHPRA’s website contains policies and guidelines that every health practitioner and every owner/operator of a registered health service should read and understand.

    1. Social media policy
    2. Guidelines for advertising regulated health services
    3. Dental guidelines – Scope of practice registration standard

    A breach of the advertising rules under the National Law is a criminal offence. AHPRA is at liberty to prosecute advertisers for such offences, which carry the risk of a criminal conviction and a penalty of up to $5,000 for an individual and $10,000 for a body corporate.

    Protected titles – the legislation

    Sections 118 and 119 of the National Law prohibit a person who is not a ‘specialist health practitioner’ from using such a title or from taking or using any title, name, symbol, word or description, which in the circumstances indicates or could reasonably be understood to indicate, to the public that the person is a specialist health practitioner or that the person is authorised or qualified to practice in a recognised specialty, or that the person is registered in an area in which he or she is not registered, or that a person holds an endorsement that he or she does not hold.

    The above provisions apply equally to practitioners’ own advertising, as they do to other persons (or legal entities) that carry out advertising for registered health practitioners or services offered by registered health practitioners.

    A contravention of sections 118 or 119 is considered ‘unprofessional conduct’ under the National Law, for which disciplinary action may be taken by the National Board, and in the case of a prosecution by AHPRA, these offences carry maximum penalties of $30,000 for an individual and $60,000 in the case of a body corporate.

    Examples of compliance issues

    Issues can frequently arise in connection with general dental practices that focus on orthodontic services. General dental practitioners and general dental practices in these circumstances must be very careful not to hold themselves out as specialist orthodontists or to use words, phrases, symbols or descriptions that might indicate this is the case.

    AHPRA has taken issue with advertising (mostly on practice websites) containing phrases such as ‘specialising in orthodontics’ or ‘specialising in root canal therapy’. While these phrases do not expressly state that a practitioner is or may be a specialist orthodontist or endodontist (as the case may be), they may give rise to such an inference whether expressly or by implication.

    In the case of general dental practices and general dental practitioners, it is recommended that the term specialist and all derivatives of that term (i.e. specialising in…; special focus on; areas of speciality or specialisation etc) be avoided.

    Alternative phrases might include ‘focus on…’, ‘experienced in…’, ‘practice dedicated to…’.

    In some cases, it will be appropriate for advertising to specifically state that the practice or the practitioner is not a registered specialist in his or her field.

    Meridian Lawyers recently assisted a dental clinic practice that set up separate rooms in an old specialist medical centre and where AHPRA subsequently took issue with the words ‘specialist centre’ remaining on the building’s outdoor signage after the specialist centre component of the tenancy had disbanded. The general dental clinic and the specialty medical practice had co-existed at the same premises, operating under different names and different businesses, for many years. But once the specialist medical practice ceased to operate from the premises, the issue arose whether it was appropriate for the front signage (which contained the historically relevant words ‘specialist centre’) to continue to remain on the building premises. The practitioner changed the signage to accommodate the concerns identified by AHPRA.

    The current National Law has been operating for in excess of five years and registered health practitioners and operators of registered health practices are now well expected and required to know their obligations in connection with advertising rules and offences. The Board publishes guidelines and codes of conduct in relation to these matters, which are accessible and easy to read.

    For more information, please contact Special Counsel Tamir Katz or Principal Kellie Dell’Oro.

    Download this article.

     

     
    Fields marked with an * are required
     
     

professional

  • Guild's guide to a risk free holiday season

    With the holiday season approaching, it’s time to remind ourselves of the possible threats to our homes and cars during this time. In the lead up to what should be a fun and festive time with loved ones, it’s important to think about what you can do to protect your valuable assets during this period.

    Thefts and burglaries increase at this time as a lot of crime is opportunistic; thieves know that houses and cars might be full of newly purchased gifts. Thieves also know that with people away on holidays, there is an increased opportunity to break into cars and homes.

    However, holiday dangers aren’t just about thefts and burglaries. People also need to think about what they can do to protect their homes and cars from damage or unnecessary costs while on holidays, as well as keeping themselves safe.

    Protecting your home
    Before heading off on holidays:

    • Be mindful of how you dispose of packaging of gifts or newly purchased items. A bin full of boxes for items such as televisions, game consoles or tablets lets people know what valuable items are in the home.

    • Ask a friend or neighbour to collect your mail. A build-up of mail is a sure sign someone isn’t home.

    • Use a timer to have your house lights turn on and off at certain periods of the day, creating a look of someone being in.

    • Consider what appliances can be turned off within your home. While usage is low, many appliances continue to use power even when they aren’t being used. Items to consider turning off include hot water tanks, televisions, microwaves and computers. However, be sure to think about what you’re turning off before you quickly switch off all power; for example, fridges and freezers, unless empty, should be kept on.

    • Clear out your gutters. A build-up of leaves and other debris creates a fire hazard as well as a risk of an overflow of water entering the roof space during a storm.

    Protecting your car

    • If leaving your car at home while on holidays, where possible leave it locked securely in a garage or somewhere else out of sight. Thieves will notice a car sitting in the sam spot every day which hasn’t moved.

    • Don’t keep valuables in sight that could entice those opportunistic
    thieves. This applies to items used all year, such as mobile phones. However, over the holiday season it also applies to shopping bags which are clearly full of new items.

    • When taking your car on holidays, be sure you have some sort of roadside assistance or breakdown coverage to protect you during those
    unexpected moments.

    • If sharing driving duties during a road trip, be sure the insurance policy for the car covers all drivers.

    • Take regular breaks on long drives by either swapping drivers or taking rest breaks. Also, when on long drives, plan your stops to allow for petrol fill ups and food and drink stops.

    • Be particularly careful when driving at dawn and dusk as visibility generally isn’t as clear as during the day.


    Download the printable version

    riskhq-download-button

    risks
  • Are you insured against a cyber attack?

    Cyber-attacks are the fastest growing crimes throughout Australia and across the world. And with the majority of businesses not insured against cyber-attacks, the effect can be crippling. Take a look at our infographic to learn more and see if you are covered against cybercrime.

    Cyber Infographic

    compensation

business

  • Five tips to avoid a devastating fire

    Even the smallest fire could wipe out your business. Here’s five tips to avoid a devastating fire all year round:

    1. Clear space is a must
    To help prevent overheating, ensure there’s enough clear space around all electrical equipment.

    2. Avoid using temporary options
    Extension cords and power boards were designed to be temporary options. Where possible, have additional power points installed.

    3. Maintain your workspace
    Keep dust, moisture and clutter to a minimum. Avoid having food, drinks and flammable items near electrical equipment.

    4. Implement safety measures
    Maintain your property and ensure your fire safety services are always up to date.

    5. Those who fail to plan, plan to fail
    In the unfortunate event of a fire, a simple action plan can minimise the risk of harm to people and property.

    For more information call 1800 810 213 or visit your local Fire Service website.

    accidents
  • Advertising: A timely reminder

    Reading relevant articles can count towards your required continuing professional development hours.  Therefore, reading the article below may assist you to achieve these required hours. (see more below)

    Advertising compliance has been on the Australian Health Practitioner Regulation Agency’s radar recently, with Meridian Lawyers assisting a number of health practitioners, including dental practitioners, in relation to notices of concern.

    Advertising restrictions – the legislation

    Section 133 of the Health Practitioner Regulation National Law, as in force in each state and territory (the National Law), prohibits advertising that (in connection with a regulated health service):

    1. is false, misleading or deceptive or is likely to be so
    2. offers a gift, discount or other inducement to attract a user of the health service without stating the terms and conditions of the offer
    3. uses testimonials or purported testimonials
    4. creates an unreasonable expectation of beneficial treatment, and/or
    5. encourages the indiscriminate or unnecessary use of health services (see Dental Board Guidelines).

    Examples of compliance issues

    Some of the recently identified issues relate to:

    • interactions with patients on social media, including reviews left by patients on a dental practice’s Facebook page where the content of the review may qualify as a testimonial
    • a practitioner who offered a free home whitening kit when the patient underwent a particular course of treatment
    • ‘two for the price of one’ offers for dental services such as implants or crowns, particularly where the patient seeing the advertising has not yet been examined or treatment planned, and where the full terms and conditions of the offer are not fully and not prominently displayed with the offer
    • the use of words, terms, or titles, which may indicate or which may be seen to indicate to the public, that a practitioner is a specialist practitioner in circumstances where the practitioner is not so qualified and/or endorsed.The advertising rules (and penalties) apply to anyone and any entity that advertises a regulated health service – whether that person or entity is a registered health practitioner or not.

    The following AHPRA/Dental Board publications are relevant:

    AHPRA’s website contains policies and guidelines that every health practitioner and every owner/operator of a registered health service should read and understand.

    1. Social media policy
    2. Guidelines for advertising regulated health services
    3. Dental guidelines – Scope of practice registration standard

    A breach of the advertising rules under the National Law is a criminal offence. AHPRA is at liberty to prosecute advertisers for such offences, which carry the risk of a criminal conviction and a penalty of up to $5,000 for an individual and $10,000 for a body corporate.

    Protected titles – the legislation

    Sections 118 and 119 of the National Law prohibit a person who is not a ‘specialist health practitioner’ from using such a title or from taking or using any title, name, symbol, word or description, which in the circumstances indicates or could reasonably be understood to indicate, to the public that the person is a specialist health practitioner or that the person is authorised or qualified to practice in a recognised specialty, or that the person is registered in an area in which he or she is not registered, or that a person holds an endorsement that he or she does not hold.

    The above provisions apply equally to practitioners’ own advertising, as they do to other persons (or legal entities) that carry out advertising for registered health practitioners or services offered by registered health practitioners.

    A contravention of sections 118 or 119 is considered ‘unprofessional conduct’ under the National Law, for which disciplinary action may be taken by the National Board, and in the case of a prosecution by AHPRA, these offences carry maximum penalties of $30,000 for an individual and $60,000 in the case of a body corporate.

    Examples of compliance issues

    Issues can frequently arise in connection with general dental practices that focus on orthodontic services. General dental practitioners and general dental practices in these circumstances must be very careful not to hold themselves out as specialist orthodontists or to use words, phrases, symbols or descriptions that might indicate this is the case.

    AHPRA has taken issue with advertising (mostly on practice websites) containing phrases such as ‘specialising in orthodontics’ or ‘specialising in root canal therapy’. While these phrases do not expressly state that a practitioner is or may be a specialist orthodontist or endodontist (as the case may be), they may give rise to such an inference whether expressly or by implication.

    In the case of general dental practices and general dental practitioners, it is recommended that the term specialist and all derivatives of that term (i.e. specialising in…; special focus on; areas of speciality or specialisation etc) be avoided.

    Alternative phrases might include ‘focus on…’, ‘experienced in…’, ‘practice dedicated to…’.

    In some cases, it will be appropriate for advertising to specifically state that the practice or the practitioner is not a registered specialist in his or her field.

    Meridian Lawyers recently assisted a dental clinic practice that set up separate rooms in an old specialist medical centre and where AHPRA subsequently took issue with the words ‘specialist centre’ remaining on the building’s outdoor signage after the specialist centre component of the tenancy had disbanded. The general dental clinic and the specialty medical practice had co-existed at the same premises, operating under different names and different businesses, for many years. But once the specialist medical practice ceased to operate from the premises, the issue arose whether it was appropriate for the front signage (which contained the historically relevant words ‘specialist centre’) to continue to remain on the building premises. The practitioner changed the signage to accommodate the concerns identified by AHPRA.

    The current National Law has been operating for in excess of five years and registered health practitioners and operators of registered health practices are now well expected and required to know their obligations in connection with advertising rules and offences. The Board publishes guidelines and codes of conduct in relation to these matters, which are accessible and easy to read.

    For more information, please contact Special Counsel Tamir Katz or Principal Kellie Dell’Oro.

    Download this article.

     

     
    Fields marked with an * are required
     
     
    advertising

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